Filler Metals/Electrodes

Ways to Get the Most Out of Your MIG Gun Consumables

Here are a few of the best practices that every welding operator should know when it comes to choosing and maintaining nozzles, contact tips, retaining heads and gas diffusers, and cable.
Experts
Filler Metals/Electrodes: Articles

Matching Filler Metals to Stainless Steels

Hardfacing caster roll. Hard martensitic stainless steel is often used in high-wear applications, such as overlays and for building up wear-resistant material, and less for joining. With a high interpass temperature, it’s imperative to reach an accurate preheat temperature and maintain the minimum interpass temperature the entire welding time. If not, there is a risk of cracking.
Welding stainless remains complicated. Besides paying close attention to heating and cooling the stainless, the filler metal must be properly matched to the base metal with electrodes of the same grade. 

Considerations When Selecting a Filler Metal (Part One)

Having the right filler metal for the job can have a significant impact on quality, productivity and cost. Different filler metals provide varying mechanical and chemical properties — but in every case, the welds they create must be able to withstand the service conditions they will encounter.
Filler metal selection is critical to maintain the integrity of the final weldment. Here is a review of their general properties that can help you determine which filler metal is ideal for the job. 

Tips to Make Welding Operations More Profitable

Fabricators should remember that implementing any improvements in a welding operation isn’t a one-time event — it’s important to monitor any changes to make sure they continue to benefit the welding operation.
These tips may involve an investment of time, effort and resources, but they can pay off in the long run for welding operations that use a variety of welding processes and equipment. 

Gaining Efficiencies by Increasing Welding Wire Size

Many welding operations standardize on one size of wire for every application to minimize confusion for welders and avoid overcomplicating inventory and training. However, this can be problematic if the shop welds a wide range of applications that vary by material thickness or joint type.
The time and energy it takes to make the conversion from smaller-diameter wire to a larger one could save countless hours and improve quality. Here are several initial steps that are necessary to make the conversion.

Tips for Taking the Trouble Out of Aluminum Welding

Minimize the risk of oxygen entering the weld pool by decreasing the MIG gun angle and/or by increasing the nozzle size so the shielding gas envelope is larger. Holding the nozzle slightly closer to the base material when welding can also help. Be certain that there is no spatter buildup in the nozzle that could hinder the shielding gas flow, and set up barriers when welding in drafty areas to prevent the shielding gas from being disturbed or blowing away. Always use a push angle when welding aluminum, as this direction helps put the cleaning action from the arc in front of the weld and results in less discoloration.
Here are some tips on how to maintain exceptional cleanliness, select the right filler metal and employ the correct welding preparations to remove the oxide layer on the surface of the material.

 

Filler Metals/Electrodes: Industry News

Hobart Campaign Celebrates Partnership with U.S. Navy

The campaign, “It’s the tie that binds,” showcases the Marine Group Boat Works partnership with the U.S. Navy to celebrate creating some of the most distinctive and instrumental things that impact the world.

Hobart Launches New Brand Campaign

“It’s the tie that binds” celebrates the journey from the filler metals customers use to the relationships developed on the journey to find the right filler metal solution.

Rent a Robot at Miller Electric

The new Robotic Welding Cell Rental Program allows end users to test automation in their own welding operation before purchasing equipment, minimizing risk and barriers regarding capital expenditures, and helping businesses meet short-run production demands.

 

Filler Metals/Electrodes: Products

Down to the (Flux-Cored) Wire

Preferred for shipbuilding, UltraCore HD Marine from Lincoln Electric is a gas-shielded, flux-cored wire electrode that enables a flat bead shape when welding at high deposition rates in all positions. This new electrode offers improved operator appeal through lower spatter and lower fumes generation rates.
Designed specifically for toughness in critical applications, these new flux-cored wire solutions meet the most unforgiving demands of shipbuilding and offshore fabrication.

Mild Steel and Low-Alloy Flux-Cored Welding Wires

Ideal for offshore oil and gas topsides and platforms requiring high corrosion resistance with stress-relieved high strength and low temperature impact toughness properties, Dual Shield II 4130 SR from ESAB is an all-position flux-cored wire for welding low-alloy, high-strength steels such as 4130. This flux-cored welding wire offers mechanical properties in the as-welded and after PWHT conditions and meets ANSI/NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1.
ESAB offers two wires in its series of flux-cored welding consumables: Dual Shield II 4130 SR and Dual Shield II 70-Ni1 H4.

Tough Flux-Cored Wire for Shipbuilding and Demanding Offshore Work

Preferred for shipbuilding, UltraCore HD Marine from Lincoln Electric is a gas-shielded, flux-cored wire electrode that enables a flat bead shape when welding at high deposition rates in all positions. This new electrode offers improved operator appeal through lower spatter and lower fumes generation rates.
Premium UltraCore gas-shielded flux-cored wire from Lincoln Electric creates a tough weld that stands up to temperature extremes, corrosive saltwater, constant moisture and other adverse conditions, while exceeding demanding industry requirements.